Tuscan Traveler’s Pick – New Biscotti Museum in Florence

On the occasion of the 160th anniversary of its founding, the Biscottificio Antonio Mattei, the famed biscotti bakery, is opening its Piccolo Museo Bottega  in the heart of Florence.

Shop in the Biscotti Museum

With the same spirit of simplicity and elegance that has always distinguished Mattei’s image world-wide, the well-designed space contains an archive of memorabilia and documents that tell the story of both the company and the Pandolfini family, who have been operating the  biscottificio since 1904, when they inherited it from Antonio Mattei.

A portion of the Mattei archives

The museum of Mattei’s long history is divided into five sections dedicated to the various phases of the workmanship, from the historical tools to the ever-evolving packaging to the new takes on the decades-old recipe. And, of course, it will also be possible to buy and taste their scrumptious products.

Another goal of the Piccolo Museo Mattei is to highlight the synergy and relation between the two similar, but competing towns – Prato and Florence – by opening a “window” onto lesser- known Prato’s history in order to make both Italian and international visitors aware of one of Prato’s gourmet offerings.

Piccolo Museo Bottega

Via Porta Rossa 76/r

Monday  3.00pm / 7.00pm

Tuesday / Sunday  10.00am / 7.00pm

4 thoughts on “Tuscan Traveler’s Pick – New Biscotti Museum in Florence

  1. Hi Ann!
    Hope you are doing well! It certainly seems like you are capitalizing on your love of Italy! Colleen and I were emailing about you yesterday, since she has friends heading to Florence soon. I found your old email which was undeliverable, but she googled you! And there you were! I look forward to reading your books, especially the mysteries! You made our April 2004 trip to Florence so absolutely special! Look forward to your posts!
    Deb

  2. A   love of reading murder mysteries and thrillers coupled with a fascination for the museums, markets and trattorias, historic palaces, and the less-traveled alleys of Florence inspired Ann Reavis to write about the exploits of Inspector Caterina Falcone.

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