Tuscan Traveler’s Picks – A Dozen Top Italy Blogs

Every two years or so, everyone who maintains a travel website or blog should clean up their Blogroll. For those who have never clicked on a Blogroll link or even thought “blogroll” was a word: a blogroll is the list of other websites or blogs (hopefully with handy click-through links) that a blogger (or travel writer, a term I prefer) either reads, or believes should be read. A blogger may have exchanged links with other websites in hopes of greater shared readership, or may believe that a blogroll should be created and maintained as part of the website management to-do list, or may have a myriad of other reasons for the list.

Photo by Melika http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/writing/images/9349790/title/pen-paper-wallpaper

The problem with a blogroll is that, unless you are linking to sites like The New York Times (or, come to think of it, even if you are linking to TNYT), the links will  become stale as Tuscan bread, meaning it is impossible to get through anymore. Further, in a place like Italy bloggers tend to pick up and move back to Dallas, Denver or Derbyshire, the story ending with a still relevant “Twenty Things I Love about Italy” post written four years ago. (In Italy the twenty things really don’t change all that much, I’ve found.)

Even if the writer is still in-country and posting away, the frustrations of WordPress, Blogger, Typepad, LiveJournal, and the like, or the failure to maintain the payments for the domain name and/or server, will result in a “404 Not Found” status code or a “503 Service Unavailable” or some such pothole in the internet highway to “Life in Italy.”

So today, I wandered back into my Blogroll, inspired by A.K. at Arttrav.com who is in competition with some other fine writers for Blog Awards 2013 at Italy Magazine. Going through the Italy Magazine Blog Categories I found a number of sites that I hadn’t heard of and will follow in the future. That led me to the job of adding those to my Blogroll, which led me to check the links and do an early spring cleaning of the whole list, which can be found by clicking on the link found right below the Tuscan Traveler banner.

All of the boring back and forth of clicking and checking and deleting and linking and checking again and swearing and starting all over, resulted in the idea that I, too, could do the impossible and pick the twelve best Italy blogs. Of course, this is completely subjective and subject to change next week, next month or next year. But I hope that none of these folks get tired of Italy or done with writing or weary of the process of posting or get a “real” job that eats up all of their blogging time and energy because I love reading what they write and marvel at the photography skills of most of them.

Tuscan Traveler’s Top Dozen Italy Blogs

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Arttrav

Arttrav is a blog about art, travel, and expat life in Florence, Italy.  Alongside art historical information, exhibit and museum reviews, you will find articles about the people and events that make up the lively nature of Italian life. Alexandra Korey has a PhD in Renaissance Italian art history from the University of Chicago and a goal to make art accessible. She has a real job, but luckily it is internet-related so she can keep Arttrav going while at work.

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Emiko Davies Regional Italian Cuisine 

Living in Florence, for seven years taught Emiko Davies a few things about Italian cuisine. One, that recipes of Tuscany are not all there is to Italian food. Instead, there are twenty regional cuisines. Two, that traditions rule. On her site she shares the anecdotes, techniques and history behind some favourite traditional regional recipes. If you’re making a trip to Florence or indeed anywhere in Tuscany soon and you’d like some tips on where to eat or places to visit, you’ll find things throughout her blog, like her favorite gelato shops, breakfast spots, where to eat like a Florentine, panini and wine bars and other food adventures.

Emiko has one of the most beautiful food sites of any country. Her writing and photographs can be found in a number of places, both online and in print, so start with her “About” page to get an idea of where to find more of her stuff after you’ve devoured her Regional Italian Cuisine blog.

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The Bittersweet Gourmet &  Platform 17

Living in the Bel Paese, in the tiny town of Grezzano in Tuscany, about an hour from Florence, Amy Gulick was in love with an Italian, but oceans now divided her from the people to whom she’d been closest. For many of those early years it seemed every minor success she achieved in her adoptive country necessitated a number of setbacks. This tough, perplexing, sometimes sorrowful time was not without its joys, however. On the contrary: it was also thrilling, full of first-time experiences with food, art, travel, new friends, and a new lifestyle she would soon come to cherish. She now says that no word more aptly sums up her initiation into Italian life than “bittersweet.”

Amy is maintaining two blogs (I hope, because my favorite is Platform 17 with both its history posts and its “life back of beyond in Italy” stories, and the last post is dated October 2013 . . . ), a scrumptious home food one, The Bittersweet Gourmet, with recipes and the other with a great “About” story of why it is called Platform 17, the unluckiest number in Italy.

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Mozzarella Mamma

How does a young American woman brought up on field hockey, frozen vegetables, washing machines, takeout Chinese food and backpacking become transformed into a functioning Italian mamma with perfect pasta and luscious legs? Impossible, but Trisha Thomas is giving it her best and writing about it as she goes.

Over the past 16 years, she has been raising her children and her “mamma buddies” have provided the understanding and wisdom to get her through. One mamma friend summed up beautifully her concerns about being an Italian-style mamma. She said, “We try to teach them good values, we try to teach them to work hard and do their best, but somehow I think we are turning our children into mozzarellas.”

Trisha has jotted down her humorous experiences as she has both worked for a television news agency and endeavored to become a good Italian mamma without losing her American-ness. She divides the anecdotes into different categories—food tales, health stories, clothing issues, and lately, Italy’s political foibles.

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Rebecca’s Brigolante Blog

Rebecca Winke, originally from Chicago, joined her husband Stefano in Assisi in 1993, and shortly thereafter the couple began a lengthy renovation project on the Brigolante farmhouse, which has been in the Bagnoli family for at least eight generations.

She posts essays that touch on her life as an American transplanted to the Umbrian countryside. If you have ever dreamed of picking up and moving to the Bel Paese, you will enjoy reading the cautionary tales on her blog that arise from life in Umbria.  Her real job of running a fabulous B&B and raising children keeps her really busy, except in the winter when school is in session and the B&B business is slow. So I hope her memory is good and she gets a year’s worth of posts written down in January and February.

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Not Just Another Dolce Vita 

Ever since Sarah Mastroianni can remember she has been fascinated by the Italian language and has felt strongly connected to her Italian roots. She has a Master of Arts in Italian Studies from the University of Toronto, and experience travelling, studying and working in Italy. She like to hang her hat in Siena, but her stories take her all over Italy. This blog gives her an outlet through which to express her love for Italian language and culture, to write (another passion) and also to share her firsthand knowledge with other fans of Italy.

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Parla Food

Katie Parla is from New Jersey and she earned a BA in Art History from Yale. In 2003, shortly after graduating, she moved to Rome and since then has earned a sommelier certificate (FISAR) and an MA in the Cultura Gastronomica Italiana. She has written and edited more than 20 books and her food criticism and travel writing have appeared all over the world. (She never sleeps.) She is now a Rome-based food and beverage educator and journalist so her blog is here to stay.

Parla Food is her personal blog where she gets to take a break from her day job of lecturing, giving private tours, and writing for others. She writes mostly about food issues facing diners in Rome and in Italy. Sometimes she sneaks in a non-food related topic if she is really excited about something and wants to share. She recently picked up an archeological speleology certification from the city of Rome so we should be reading soon about what is underneath the streets of Rome.

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Rubber Slippers In Italy

It’s a long, long way from Hawaii to Italy for Rowena. Living in the land of pasta, pizza, and wine is everything you might imagine, but one thing remains true: You can take the girl out of the island but you can’t take the island out of the girl.  Like many who have suddenly found themselves in a new environment, the desire to document every experience gave birth to Rowena’s humble little page on Blogspot. That page grew into more pages, year after year, developing into compilation of recipes, travels around Italy, and discoveries in a place that is so very unlike Hawaii.

Her dogs Mr. B and Mads are along for the ride whether they want to or not because she is compiling the “100 Ways to Celebrate Italy” (80 and counting) a fascinating compilation of sagras, festivals, parades, and carnivals.

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Green Holiday in Italy

Anna is a freelance journalist living in a stunning corner of Italy, Abruzzo, and doing her bit for the planet: she recycles religiously, grows organic vegetables, shops and eats local and make an effort to keep her holidays as green as possible. She started this site to share her passion for slow travel in Italy.

She sees responsible travel as looking at the world around you closely, making conscious choices and giving back to the places you visit and the people you meet. Her site has some of the beautiful photographs found on the internet and is one of the very few places you can find a post that starts out: “Birdwatching in Italy has just become more exciting! After 400 years the Northern Bald Ibis returned to Northern Italy.”

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Rick’s Rome

Yes, most of the best Italy bloggers are women. But then there is Rick Zullo.  Quite a few years ago he came to Italy on an extended vacation (he called it a “sabbatical” just to make it sound impressive, but let’s be honest…).  About midway through that trip, he fell in love with Rome on his very first night in the city.  On the second night, he fell in love with one of its inhabitants (who is now his wife).  Rick found being an American in Rome to be challenging. Rick’s Rome describes many of his trials and tribulations, how he’s been able to overcome them or at least come to a compromise, making the most out of living in that fascinating, perplexing, chaotic city.

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Timeless Italy

Susan Nelson is happiest walking the cobbled streets of Italy and exploring ruins that have existed for thousands of years. She has an exquisite eye for the the great photo shot, ranging from the quirky corner to the breath-taking vista. Giant aqueducts, earthy catacombs, back streets and back roads, mystical legends of the saints — they all catch her imagination. She shares her thoughts and experiences through Timeless Italy; a perfect companion for the armchair adventurer. 

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Over the Tuscan Stove

Judy Witts Francini adores shopping the markets and being inspired to cook with local seasonal food. She began her career as a pastry chef in San Francisco and when she moved to Florence she started from scratch in learning a whole new way to cook and eat. In 1997, she started her website Divina Cucina with a dining guide to Florence and Chianti and also Tuscan recipes. Soon after she started sharing her thoughts and observations in Over The Tuscan Stove. Now she’s expanding into the world of travel apps.

She writes about meeting the individuals who grow, make and sell the authentic food of Tuscany,  learning from them the age-old family traditions. Her recent tours to Sicily and southern Italy have provided a whole new set of posts and pictures.

Baker’s Dozen

If you want to get into the act, you can always comment on any post that these twelve superb writers produce. But to get a real conversation going about all things Italy (and France and Spain and . . . ) join the Slow Europe Travel Forums at SlowEurope.com, created by Pauline Kenny the creator of the Slow Travel movement with her original site SlowTravel.

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What are your favorite Italy websites? Leave a comment here.

12 thoughts on “Tuscan Traveler’s Picks – A Dozen Top Italy Blogs

  1. My favorite is Tuscan Traveler. All the best, Ann. I loved the article Francesca did about you! It’s so true that lawyer part of you that pays attention to detail and history gives Tuscan Traveler it’s flair and uniqueness that makes what you say so much more than “I was an American and now I’m living in Italy and I tell the reader what that’s all about” blogs.

  2. Thanks Mary Ellen! It’s still fun to keep coming up with things to write about (an excuse for a new restaurant or store), but I have a lot lot competition (inspiration) from the folks listed in this post.

    As for Francesca’s post: I hope you are buying Italian Food Rules for all of your friends who coming to Italy. I know you know all of the rules.

  3. You certainly have selected the proverbial cream of the crop here, Trisha Thomas and Judy Witts Francini, in particular. They are both gifted professionals who, week after week, bring the best of Italy to their readers.

  4. Wow Thanks Ann! I found this by chance… and am proud to be top of the list (or is it alphabetical order?). I always enjoy reading YOUR blog because, like me, you like delving into the stranger things.
    Just one thing – I don’t work on arttrav while doing my day job! I try hard to keep things separate, so arttrav gets done nights, weekends, and on my day off (I work 4 days a week so that I can do the blog and other things) :).

  5. You caught me off-guard. I was enjoying the list of blogs, some that I am familiar with and others that are new to me, and suddenly there I was! I’m so thrilled that my blog made the list. This is truly an honor for me, as I am so impressed with all of the others and admire them so much. Thank you, thank you! Susan

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